Tag Archives: theology

How to understand church history

This article was posted in Ignatian perspectives.

Bishops

image: Sebastian Niedlich (Grabthar)

Diarmaid MacCulloch is a highly respected Oxford historian and one understands why. This is indeed a very impressive scholarly performance, a comprehensive history of twenty centuries of the Christian religion in all the regions where it made its appearance, ranging from Palestine to Western and Eastern Europe, to Syria, India, China, Ethiopia. No need to repeat the praise heaped on this work by earlier reviewers. The amount and the scope of the data, and also the quality of their interpretation, are overwhelming. It certainly deserves four stars. I am withholding, though, my fifth star for the reasons that follow. Is this overview is really comprehensive? Of course it is not. A work of a mere 1150 pages is simply not sufficient to cover every development that readers might find relevant for the ulterior history of our society. Little was said about medieval Christian thinking in the areas of economics, politics, law, and science. Continue reading

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Editorial

This article was posted in JEOletter Nr. 06 / July 2009.

Editorial

Editorial

The new encyclical ‘Caritas in Veritate’ shows the immense intellectual confidence of Pope Benedict. He notes that finds his title by inverting a phrase from the Letter to the Ephesians, ‘speaking the truth in love’ – and then proclaims this coinage to be ‘the principle around which the Church’s social doctrine turns’. This claim that charity must be rooted in truth has several implications, which the Pope develops. In particular, he stresses that this charity goes beyond, but presupposes justice. There can be no ‘love in truth’ without justice, and ‘to desire the common good and strive towards it is a requirement of justice and charity’. Continue reading

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A ‘neoconservative’ reading of ‘Caritas in Veritate’

This article was posted in JEOletter Nr. 06 / July 2009.

Caritas in Veritate

Caritas in Veritate

A ‘neoconservative’ reading of ‘Caritas in Veritate’
Frank Turner

George Weigel is a respected US commentator on Catholic affairs who has written widely on Catholic Social Teaching. He is a profound admirer of John Paul II. It is not surprising that he traces approvingly those elements in the new encyclical that, so he believes, Pope Benedict takes over from John Paul’s ‘Christian personalism’: ‘The clearly Benedictine passages in Caritas in Veritate follow and develop the line of John Paul II, particularly in the new encyclical’s strong emphasis on the life issues (abortion, euthanasia, embryo-destructive stem-cell research) as social-justice issues’.  Such passages, suggests Weigel, may be ‘marked in gold’. Continue reading

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Le concept de régulation dans l’Enseignement social de l’Eglise catholique

This article was posted in European Consciousness.

Regulation

Regulation


« Plus le système économique et financier mondial atteint des niveaux élevés de complexité fonctionnelle et d’organisation, plus le devoir de réguler ces processus apparaît prioritaire, pour les finaliser à la poursuite du bien commun de la famille humaine »
Compendium de la Doctrine Sociale de l’Eglise, N°371.

La dérégulation coûte cher quand le « devoir de réguler » n’apparaît pas « prioritaire ». Au total, près de 1900 milliards d’euros ont été engagés pour consolider le système financier dans l’UE et restaurer les conditions normales de financement de l’économie. Continue reading

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A Theology of Work

This article was posted in Ignatian perspectives.
worker

A Theology of Work

Work and Labour
In George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch (first published in 1871, and perhaps the supreme English novel of the nineteenth century) the rich and irresponsible Fred Vincy loves Mary Garth. He knows she thinks of him as idle, and he therefore considers becoming apprenticed to her father Caleb, a builder and surveyor. Could Fred make a success of a trade?

‘That depends’, said Caleb, turning his head on one side and lowering his voice, with the air of a man who felt himself to be saying something deeply religious. `You must be sure of two things: you must love your work, and not be always looking over the end of it, wanting your play to begin. And the other is, you must not be ashamed of your work, and think it would be more honourable to you to be doing something else…. No matter what a man is – I wouldn’t give twopence for him . . . whether he was the prime minister or the rick-thatcher, if he didn’t do well what he undertook to do? (ch. 56). Continue reading

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